Psychology

Collin D. Barnes

Assistant Professor of Psychology
"My approach to teaching psychology begins with treating the ways of thinking that motivate different kinds of psychological inquiry as the most important discoveries students can make."
— Collin Barnes

Education

B.S., John Brown University, 2003

M.S., University of Oklahoma, 2006

Ph.D., University of Oklahoma, 2010

Memberships

Michael Polanyi Society

Society for the Teaching of Psychology

Publications

Barnes, C.D., Pomerantz, A., & Yashko, L. (2015). Children cover your eyes: Masculine honor and the role of blind patriotism in teaching national allegiance to posterity. Political Psychology.

Barnes, C. D., Brown, R. P., Lenes, J., Bosson, J., & Carvallo, M. (2014). My country, my self: Honor, identity, and aggressive opposition to national threats. Self and Identity, 13, 638-662.

Barnes, C. D., Brown, R. P., & Osterman, L. (2012). Don’t tread on me: Masculine honor ideology in the U.S. and militant responses to terrorism. Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, 38, 1018-1029.

Barnes, C. D., Brown, R. P., & Tamborski, M. (2011). Living dangerously: Culture of honor, risk-taking, and the non-randomness of fatal ‘accidents.’ Social Psychological and Personality Science, 3, 100-107.

Barnes, C. D., Carvallo, M., Brown, R. P., & Osterman, L. (2010). Forgiveness and the need to belong. Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, 36, 1148-1160.

Barnes, C. D., Brown, R. P., & Osterman, L. (2009). Protection, payback, or both? Emotional and motivational mechanisms underlying avoidance by victims of transgressions. Motivation and Emotion, 33, 400-411.

About

My love for psychology, and particularly social psychology, was born from a fascination with the way that abstract notions such as motivation and personality can be quantified in measurement procedures. I was likewise enchanted by the ingenuity of professionals who created controlled laboratory situations that approximated real-world events for the purpose of testing hypotheses. Today, however, my fascination with psychology revolves around questions about the discipline’s philosophical and historical roots and how the aspirations of science are expressed differently by early, influential figures in the field. I believe that the philosopher-scientist model exemplified by these early thinkers needs to be recovered.

My approach to teaching psychology begins with treating the ways of thinking that motivate different kinds of psychological inquiry as the most important discoveries students can make. I show how John B. Watson’s desire for strict objectivity compelled him to eschew the mind as only a word and reduce all psychology to behavior. I highlight in the writings of Wolfgang Kohler his insistence that naïve observation is the entry point for psychological investigation and that direct experience can be the object of legitimate scientific study. I underline Carl Jung’s conviction that psychical and societal life are properly understood as manifestations of our primordial past and that the psyche, as an autonomous reality, cannot be understood in strictly biological terms.

The consequences of such ideas for how we see ourselves is enormous. By considering them openly, my aim is for students to see how every method of inquiry has a particular epistemology as its starting point. Where our questions take us depends on the direction our epistemology is pointing. Beyond this, I want students to appreciate the permeability of disciplinary boundaries and the crucial role of liberal learning in forming this appreciation. By showing students my own labors to liberally educate myself, I hope to inspire them to do the same.