Korey D. Maas
History

Korey D. Maas

Associate Professor of History
“My aim in the teaching of history is never merely to describe ‘change over time’ but, with my students, seriously to examine, to debate, and so to understand both the causes and the consequences of change.”
— Korey D. Maas

Faculty Information

Additional Faculty Information for Korey D. Maas

Education

B.A. (magna cum laude), Concordia University, River Forest, IL, 1993

M.Div., Concordia Seminary, St. Louis, MO, 1998

S.T.M., Concordia Seminary, St. Louis, MO, 1999

M.St. (with distinction), University of Oxford, Oxford, England, 2003

D.Phil., University of Oxford, Oxford, England, 2006

Select Publications

“Luther and Liberalism: A Tale of Two Tales,” Concordia Theological Quarterly 83 (2019)

“The first and chief article: Luther’s Discovery of sola fide and its Controversial Reception in Lutheranism,” in The Doctrine on which the Church Stands or Falls: Justification in Historical, Biblical, Theological, and Pastoral Perspective, ed. Matthew Barrett (2019)

“Introduction,” in Niels Hemmingsen, On the Law of Nature: A Demonstrative Method, trans. E.J. Hutchinson (2018)

“A Lutheran View of Life and Learning: Paradox as Paradigm,” in Life and Learning in the Great Christian Traditions, ed. Gary Jenkins and Jonathan Yonan (2015)

“The Vocation of a Student,” in The Idea and Practice of a Christian University, ed. Scott Ashmon (2015)

“Niels Hemmingsen (1513-1600) and the Development of Lutheran Natural-Law Teaching,” with E.J. Hutchinson, Journal of Markets & Morality 17 (2015)

“A Poem on the Death of Robert Barnes, by Johann Sastrow (1542),” with C.J. Armstrong, Reformation and Renaissance Review 15 (2014)

“Authority and Method in the Eucharistic Debates of the Early English Reformation,” in The Search for Authority in the European Reformation, ed. Elaine Fulton, Helen Parish, and Peter Webster (2014)

“Confusion, Contention, and Confession: The Last Words of Robert Barnes and the Shaping of Theological Identity,” Sixteenth Century Journal 42 (2011)

“Natural Science, Natural Rights, and Natural Law: Abortion in Historical Perspective,” in Natural Law: A Lutheran Reappraisal, ed. Robert Baker (2011)

“A Poem to Philip Melanchthon, by Johann Sastrow (1542),” with C.J. Armstrong, Concordia Journal 36 (2010)

The Reformation and Robert Barnes: History, Theology, and Polemics in Early Modern England (2010)

“Scripture, History, and Polemic in the Early English Reformation: the curious case of Robert Barnes,” Reformation 14 (2009)

“Revisiting Robert Barnes on the Eucharist,” Concordia Theological Quarterly 72 (2008)

“A Sermon by Robert Barnes, c. 1535,” with John Craig, Journal of Ecclesiastical History 55 (2004)

Biography

History may be in the past, but that does not mean it is without effect on how we engage with contemporary issues. As is commonly recognized at Hillsdale College, ideas have consequences. And, as was well understood in the past, history might, in some sense, be thought of as philosophy teaching by example.

This being the case, my aim in the teaching of history is never merely to describe “change over time” but, with my students, seriously to examine, to debate, and so to understand both the causes and the consequences of historical events. Such understanding contributes to the great purpose of education, namely, the development of the well-furnished and well-ordered mind, fitting individuals to be, in the words of Martin Luther, “wise, honorable, and cultivated.”