Korey Maas
History

Korey Maas

Assistant Professor of History
"My aim in the teaching of history is never merely to describe 'change over time' but, with my students, seriously to examine, to debate, and so to understand both the causes and the consequences of change."
— Korey Maas

Education

B.A., Magna Cum Laude, Concordia University, River Forest, IL, 1993

M.Div., Concordia Seminary, St. Louis, MO, 1998

S.T.M., Concordia Seminary, St. Louis, MO, 1999

M.St., with distinction, University of Oxford, Oxford, England, 2003

D.Phil., University of Oxford, Oxford, England, 2006

Publications

“Niels Hemmingsen (1513-1600) and the Development of Lutheran Natural Law Teaching,” Journal of Markets and Morality 17/2 (2015)

“A Lutheran View of Life and Learning: Paradox as Paradigm” in Liberal Learning and the Great Christian Traditions (2015)

“The Vocation of a Student” in The Idea and Practice of a Christian University (2015)

“A Poem on the Death of Robert Barnes, by Johann Sastrow (1542),” Reformation and Renaissance Review 15 (2014)

Making the Case for Christianity: Responding to Modern Objections (2014)

“Authority and Method in the Eucharistic Debates of the Early English Reformation,” in The Search for Authority in the European Reformation (2014)

The Natural Knowledge of God in Christian Confession and Christian Witness (2013)

“Critical History and Historical Criticism: Reformation Roots and (Rotten) Fruits?” in Logia 22/3 (2013)

About

History may be in the past, but that does not mean it is without effect on how we engage with contemporary issues. As is commonly recognized at Hillsdale College, ideas have consequences. And, as was well understood in the past, history might, in some sense, be thought of as philosophy teaching by example.

This being the case, my aim in the teaching of history is never merely to describe “change over time” but, with my students, seriously to examine, to debate, and so to understand both the causes and the consequences of change.

My simple fascination with the subject of history stems from the continuities and discontinuities of history, the manner in which people, ideas, and institutions of other times and places can be both so foreign and yet so familiar. As such, they stand as a continual challenge to the temptations of presentism and the naïve belief that our own particular age has “figured it all out.”

Since arriving at Hillsdale’s history department in the fall of 2012, I have had the pleasure to engage in discourse with my colleagues and students about such issues.

Hillsdale’s historians do recognize that ideas have consequences, and so there is a real order to the curriculum, a real passion evident in the faculty, their teaching and their research, and an unparalleled collegiality among professors and students.

Through my own experiences, I have come to understand that the purpose of higher education, as of all education, is the development of the well-furnished and well-ordered mind, fitting individuals to be, in the words of Martin Luther, “wise, honorable, and cultivated.”

When I am not teaching history, I am living it with my lovely wife as we raise a growing family, attempt to restore an old home, and participate in the life of our parish.