Student Employment

Are you interested in making some extra pocket change and contributing to Hillsdale behind the scenes? Working on campus is a great way to build your resume and become more involved as a student. Our campus offers a wide variety of employment opportunities based on your interests and experience. The information below will help you navigate the job search process. Don’t hesitate to contact Career Services with any questions.

Handshake, the new campus platform for student employment, houses postings for available jobs on campus. Students can search and apply for jobs directly through the platform. Below is some information from Human Resources about student employment, some tips from Career Services about applying for jobs, and step-by-step instructions for job searching and application within Handshake.

Log On To Handshake

Questions?

With questions, please contact John Quint, Director of Employer Relations, or the Career Services Office.

John Quint  jquint@hillsdale.edu  (517) 607-2457

Requirements

First time student employees of the college must fill out the below documentation and deliver it in person to Human Resources before beginning work:

In addition to these documents, you must also bring a valid form of photo identification. Please check the document linked below to view a list of acceptable forms of identification.

Download Student Employment Documentation Requirements

Please note that you are not permitted to work more than 20 total hours per week, regardless of how many positions you hold. You also must carry a minimum of 7 credit hours to be eligible for student employment

Tips for Job Applications

Underqualified applications

Employers have the option to place qualifications on a job, expecting a certain GPA, major, etc. If your profile meets the qualifications of a specific position, you will see this indicated on the right side of the job posting. Students are encouraged, however, to apply for positions they aren’t eligible for if they believe they are qualified to do excellent work. In some cases, you may not have the necessary information to qualify for the job (if you don’t have a GPA yet, or haven’t picked a major, etc), and it’s possible you may still be considered for the position. In general, don’t be deterred by an employer’s preferred qualifications, because the strengths of your application may attract their attention anyway.

Applying in advance

Some job postings will indicate a firm application deadline, but you shouldn’t wait for that date to apply, as employers often do not wait for the deadline to look at applications and even make a hire. Therefore, you want to apply sooner rather than later to have a better chance of being considered. Note that some applications are rolling, which means they are always open and always hiring new people; these can be applied for at any time.

Making a personal connection

It is rare that people are hired for any job by simply submitting a resume without any other personal correspondence; the application should never replace personal communication. Therefore, it would be to your benefit to introduce yourself to a potential employer prior to or at the time of application; this is an important opportunity to make a good impression, articulate your interest in the department and position, and let them know that you have applied or are planning to apply. If the employer corresponds with you during any portion of the application process, be sure to respond punctually and professionally, and if you are invited to interview, be sure to follow up within 24 hours with a note of thanks (hand-written notes are always better than emails, if possible).

Post-Application Process

The process after you apply will vary based on the employer, who determines whether he will conduct interviews, whether he will take time to notify applicants once someone has been hired, etc. Questions regarding the position should be directed to the employer.

Regarding in-person follow-up, it is appropriate to wait 5 business days after you apply to contact the department and ask about the status of your application. This is also a good time to confirm your interest in the position in a personal way (in person or by phone).

If you accept a position and have submitted other applications, it is courteous to communicate directly with each supervisor and let them know you no longer wish to be considered for their position. This can save them a great deal of time giving attention to your application (which is emailed directly to them when you apply, and which you cannot simply withdraw in Handshake).

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